Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea (the Clap) can be transmitted through vaginal, anal or oral sex without condoms.

Gonorrhea is a bacterial, sexually transmitted infection. It can develop within a week of exposure to an infected person.

Gonorrhea can be transmitted through vaginal, anal or oral sex without condoms. Many women with gonorrhea will not have any symptoms, and others may have vaginal discharge, pelvic pain, painful periods, painful sex, pain on passing urine, or a sore throat. Gonorrhea can also cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and scarring of the fallopian tubes, which can lead to ectopic pregnancy and infertility.

If you are being tested for gonorrhea your doctor will ask you to collect a swab and urine sample.  If the results are positive, your doctor will do an internal examination.  The doctor may also suggest a repeat swab test to see which antibiotic will be best to treat the infection. If the infection was caught overseas or from a partner who has been overseas, the strains of gonorrhea are more likely to be resistant to the usual antibiotics. Today most infections are treated with a single injection called ceftriaxone.  

Gonorrhea and chlamydia infections can occur together, so you will often be treated for both at the same time if the gonorrhea test is positive. You should avoid intercourse for one week after treatment. If there is severe infection, you may need to be treated for two to four weeks, and some people may require admission to hospital and even undergo surgery. 


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